Celebrating the (Limited) Successes of the Occupation Movement

In my last blog post, I tried to outline the reasons as to why, in my opinion, the occupation movement has not been successful. As soon as the blog post was published, I started seeing comments from members of the occupation movement, with most of them telling me that I had been unfair to them: and that in spite of everything, the occupation movement has had some undeniable successes. Upon reading those comments, I came to the realization that I was indeed being too harsh on the occupation movement – and that the occupation movement has had some successes, which I should have highlighted in my last blog post. Against that background, then, in today’s blog post, I will try to celebrate the successes of the occupation movement: which however, can nonetheless only be termed as limited successes.

The occupation movement has, in my opinion, been successful to the extent that it has drawn the attention of some decision-makers to issues of social and economic justice. There is a huge possibility that without the occupation movement, the decision-makers would have remained blind to the social and economic injustice that pervades the world today.

The occupation movement has also, in my opinion, been successful to the extent that it has shown the ruling elite that there are segments of the population that are deeply dissatisfied with the current world order: segments of the population that have real grievances. Chances are that without the occupation movement, the ruling elite would have continued thinking that everyone was happy with the way things are, and that nobody had any grievances against the system.

The occupation movement has further, in my opinion, been successful to the extent that it has sown the seeds for greater agitation (for social and economic justice) in the future. Previously, people were born into the current system, which is riddled with social and economic injustices, and they accepted that ‘reality’ and never saw it as something they could change. But thanks to the occupation movement, people are slowly coming to the realization that things don’t have to be the way they are. People are slowing coming to the realization that greater social justice and economic justice is achievable – and that those are things that ordinary people can agitate for in non-violent ways.